Martin Milner and George Maharis in a Route 66 publicity photo. Image by CBS (or Screen Gems) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Known variously as The Will Rogers Highway, the Main Street of America, or the Mother Road, Route 66 was once part of American’s early Interstate system linking Chicago to California. Today, it remains an indelible part of American culture and a universal symbol of freedom and adventure on the open road. Capturing the spirit of restless youth on the move, the Route 66 TV show debuted in 1960 and ran on CBS for several seasons, originally starring Martin Milner and George Maharis as pals Tod Stiles and Buz Murdock. For many viewers, however, the real star of the show was their ride, a 1960 Corvette roadster.

The Route 66 Corvette against a fitting backdrop. Public Domain image courtesy of http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/Oltimer-Route-66-Supermarket-Sports-Car-Corvette-1639469

The old Route 66 was commissioned in 1926 and eventually bypassed by newer highways, finally being decommissioned as a federal highway by 1985. However, much like the first-generation Corvette used by Tod and Buzz, and the TV show it was named after, Route 66 never faded from the public consciousness.

According to an article posted today (November 16, 2017) on the Hemmings.com daily blog, the National Park Service studied Route 66 for possible National Historic Trail status as early as 1990, but decided against the measure, instead creating and administering the Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program which runs until 2019. As mandated by the National Trails System Act of 1968, only an act of the U.S. Congress can bring new Historic National Trail designations into force, using three selection criteria: it must have historical and national significance, and there must be adequate potential for historic interpretation or recreational use by the public.

Congressional hearings were held this week to once again consider a renewal of Route 66, which would necessarily include uniform signage along its 2,400-mile length, plus interpretive panels for travelers to view on their journey. Cooperative agreements with local organizations could also be initiated. To that end, the Route 66 Road Ahead Initiative was established, headed by Bill Thomas, who testified at this week’s Congressional hearing on the matter. House bill H.R. 801 proposes to grant National Historic Trail status to Route 66, and a separate bill, H.R. 66, the Route 66 Centennial Commission Act, was tabled earlier this year and remains in subcommittee.

In the meantime, you can experience the flavor of the Route 66 experience for yourself and anywhere you choose to go with the multiple award-winning 1960 Chevrolet Corvette ‘Dual-Quad’ roadster we are offering at Scottsdale on January 17th! Sporting the matching 283-cid, 270-horsepower engine with dual 4-barrel carbs backed by a 4-speed transmission, it is a truly exceptional ‘C1’ Corvette with the right factory equipment and outstanding presence in every respect.

Learn more about it here and get ready to bid on it at our second annual Scottdale auction by calling us at 1-800-990-6789 or by clicking here. We look forward to seeing you at the first catalogue auction held during January’s famous Scottsdale auction week!